Von Bismark | Case Study
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Case Study

By Kate Enright

So throughout this series on improving customer experience, we’ve discussed how online shopping, new technology, and social media can affect the way your customers feel about you. Well today, in part 4, we’re going to delve in the world of physical store design and layout. How these factors can make a drastic impact on consumer behaviour. It’s at a higher level and it can be as expensive or as basic as you need it to be. Every change towards positive design will help.

[caption id="attachment_1100" align="aligncenter" width="520"] An award winning design - Porsche store in Hong Kong[/caption]

By Kate Enright Facebook began dabbling in ecommerce about 3 years ago when 1-800-flowers set up the first Facebook virtual storefront and began selling through the social media giant. The idea of “F-Commerce” then began to take off in early 2011 with many large brands deciding to take advantage of large fan bases on the site. Few doubted the success of selling to Facebook fans, but those who did, slated it from the beginning. The doubters were proved right when at the start of 2012 a list of big names pulled out of the F-Commerce game due to lack of return on investment. Gamestop, one of the largest retailers on Facebook closed its store saying it was “not a place to sell”. It turned out that people did not want to buy from their “favourite” retailers through Facebook. But now Facebook have changed tack and come back to the ecommerce table with a whole new game plan. Gifts. [caption id="attachment_716" align="aligncenter" width="453"] Facebook Gifts Pilot[/caption]

By Kate Enright So we’ve all heard of online “friend finders”, dating sites and of course our favourite social media sites, Facebook and Twitter. Millions of us use these tools to connect with people every day. We log in to our online profiles, we search for people we know, barely know, just met, haven’t yet met…and we find out everything there is to know about them. from their physical appearance to their likes and interests even their relationship status (don’t deny it). But what about taking this data and using it in the physical world? Making all this information available as part of our reality. Well we can now do just that with a flexible little wristband called Amico. Amico was developed by a startup called Trovare as a way of bringing Facebook into the real world. All those online connections and details we have access to can now be used in real life to help us connect with people who have the same interests as us and face-to-face too (imagine that)! [caption id="attachment_709" align="aligncenter" width="468"] Amico Wristbands in Green[/caption]

by Kate Enright Augmented reality ads are slowly making their way into mainstream advertising and the minds of creatives industry-wide. More and more brands are now using the technology to engage consumers with both high impact advertising and with hidden digital content. Large organisations are now turning to augmented reality as a means of creating a stir around products online. The value in this is that the impact does not stop at those seeing the installations first hand, but there is an extremely high potential for these eye-catching campaigns to go viral, their digital nature is a huge draw. A good example of this is the recent Absolut Inspire app created by Absolut Vodka, calling for users to digitally overlay their “graffiti” onto public buildings, streets and walls. The ad alone had international viewership all over the web.

The Absolut Inspire ad campaign 2012.